2014/03/01

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, March 1, 2014

— a non-captioned deaf movie becoming captioned 35 years later

In 1979, the movie “And Your Name is Jonah” featuring deaf child
Jeff Bravin was the talk of the Deaf Community. It was not
captioned (remember the captioning device did not become available
until a year later). Gallaudet had to caption that movie so it
could be shown to everyone on the campus. Many years later that
movie finally became captioned, and we all realized that we missed
out a lot in that movie in 1979. Said Bravin, now an administrator
at American School for the Deaf “What¹s interesting is that the plot
of the movie remains true for many deaf students today?

 

 

— the worst actors on the theatrical stage for the deaf

Who are the worst actors on the theatrical stage? An interpreter
said that many interpreters think they have to be good actors
in order to do interpreting on the stage. The truth is that most
interpreters cannot act! They may be the best ASL theatrical
interpreters in the world but they may also be the world’s worst
actors! Who cares as long as we understand these play lines.

 

— immigrant taxi drivers afraid to communicate with the deaf?

Many taxi drivers are immigrants. For some of us, we have had
bad experiences trying to communicate with some immigrant
taxi drivers. Even when we carefully use gestures, many
immigrants do not understand such gestures! And sometimes
they struggle to understand our handwritten notes. Some taxis
have iPads in front of back seats, which is great for us.
But some taxis don’t. In Vancouver, BC, there was an agreement
between the Vancouver Taxi Association, the B.C. Coalition of
People with Disabilities and the City of Vancouver to require
taxis to be deaf-friendly and disability-friendly. Are we seeing
that in American cities?

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/deafdigest1

Twitter:
@deafdigest

02/23/14 Blue edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-blue-newsletter/

02/23/14 Gold edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-gold-newsletter/

2014/02/27

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, February 27, 2014

— becoming a hospital resident

Jessica Dunkley, a deaf woman, graduated from the University
of Ottawa Medical School. All medical school graduates must
 become residents at hospitals before they are accepted
officially as physicians. All doctors go through this.
But for Jessica, it was difficult. She graduated from
medical school in 2010 but had to wait four years before
a hospital in Alberta would accept her as a resident.
Why? Old story – discrimination, discrimination and
discrimination!

 

— deaf-friendly law firm

many deaf people need legal assistance and have been
frustrated by hearing attorneys that are not able to
communicate with them; and interpreters can be very
expensive. And many deaf attorneys do not have their
own private practices but work for someone else.
What about Great Britain? The Solicitors Regulation
Authority has an award – Deaf Law Quality Mark. It
was just given to Howells Solicitors, a law firm with
branches in several British cities. This award honors
law firms that are deaf-friendly. Do we have this such
type of honor in USA? No.

 

 

— a deaf model honored by a national TV network

Amrita TV is a TV network in Malaysia. It provides
news and entertainment programs. One of the programs
is Super Model, a reality TV show. And a recent winner
is Sophia Joe, a deaf woman, who is 5’8 tall, and
attends classes at a Malaysian university. Her background
is impressive – modeling dresses at fashion shows,
several movie roles, competing in national and local
pageants, a track and field athlete. and doing some
glass painting and jewelry designs.

 

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/deafdigest1

Twitter:
@deafdigest

02/23/14 Blue edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-blue-newsletter/

02/23/14 Gold edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-gold-newsletter/

2014/02/26

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, February 26, 2014

— A deaf convention was a surprise for a deaf woman

In 2012, Tina Webb, a deaf graduate of North Carolina School
for the Deaf, attended a deaf convention in Las Vegas. She
grew up as an adopted daughter of a hearing family. At
the convention she bumped into a deaf South Korean leader.
Anxious to know about her real parents that gave her up for
adoption, she asked this leader some questions, using
Google Translate. Much to her shock, the deaf leader knew
her birth father from work! It led to a joyful family
reunion in South Korea. Back home in North Carolina
she works with deaf adults at group homes.

 

 

— ugly small town politics

Selah is a small town in Washington with just 7,000 residents.
And small town politics can be ugly. Ashleigh Elizabeth Rice,
a deaf woman, was a lifeguard at the Selah swimming pool.
When the old mayor was replaced by a new mayor, she lost
her lifeguard job. Said a person familiar with the
situation, someone forced the new mayor to remove the
deaf woman from her job. Luckily, few weeks later the
new mayor changed mind and gave the old job back to her.
Politics should never interfere with lifesaving skills
at the swimming pool!

 

 

— a deaf social worker with an interesting background

Rosa Guzman, who is deaf, is a clinical social worker
in Massachusetts. She works with deaf clients that
need counseling. On the side she teaches ASL at a
local college. There is another side to her – a
professional bikini and figure competitor that
have won prizes in competitive programs. It looks
like bodybuilding but it is not. In bodybuilding,
judges look for extreme muscles. In figures, judges
look for the best figures. A while ago DeafDigest
mentioned a deaf bodybuilder, which is what Rosa
is not. Confusing? Yes!

 

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/deafdigest1

Twitter:
@deafdigest

02/23/14 Blue edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-blue-newsletter/

02/23/14 Gold edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-gold-newsletter/

2014/02/25

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, February 25, 2014

— an important golf official in Great Britain

People in Great Britain love to play golf. There
is golfing competition between golf clubs. Each
club has a captain, who is responsible for running
the program (more like general manager in pro sports
in USA). One such club is Ellesmere Port Golf Club.
The club members recently appointed Peter Baker as
the club captain. He is deaf. He is responsible
for everything – schedules, rules, course upkeeping,
golfing policies, fund raising, recruiting top golfers,
etc. He is also a member of the national British
Deaf Golf team.

 

 

— a new law in Arkansas

Arkansas has passed a new law, requiring interpreters to be
licensed. These interpreters must have either a RID card,
a BEI card, a QAST card, a EIPA card or some other acceptable
certificate. Will more states copy Arkansas’ new law?
(these abbreviations are interpreter certificates with
different certifying groups). Remember not too long ago,
the state hired a person, with no sign language knowledge,
to serve as vocational rehabilitation interpreter. Public
outcry forced the state to rescind its job offer.

 

 

— Citibank hangs up on deaf relay calls

A deaf person wanted to discuss a credit card transaction
with Citibank, using the relay service. She tried 13 different
times in a 4-day span and was hung up each time by the Citibank
customer service representatives. Frustrated, she told this
story with a newspaper reporter who then contacted the
bank’s outreach team. They told her it was not the policy
of Citibank to hang up on deaf customers! Fortunately for
the deaf person, the outreach team had the credit card
issue resolved. It is very scary if other banks copy
Citibank’s behavior towards the deaf.

 

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/deafdigest1

Twitter:
@deafdigest

02/23/14 Blue edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-blue-newsletter/

02/23/14 Gold edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-gold-newsletter/

2014/02/24

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, February 24, 2014

— a rare job for a deaf person

A Coda was vacationing in Dominican Republic, staying
at a hotel. She learned that the hotel has two deaf
employees, and one of them is a lifeguard! In USA,
we have known of deaf indidivuals wanting to become
lifeguards. Only they have been told the deaf cannot
become lifeguards which leads to job discrimination
lawsuits. Not that so in the Dominican Republic,
which doesn’t even have a ADA to begin with!

 

— cruelest boxer of all time

Kid McCoy, not deaf, was a pro boxing champion and was
voted as one of a boxing magazine’s 100 greatest
punchers of all time. He was also the cruelest boxer!
He fought a deaf boxer in a 1893 match. During the
fight, McCoy stopped and walked to his corner; the
deaf boxer thought the round has ended. The bell
was never rung, but the deaf boxer didn’t know that.
He walked to his corner and was hit from behind
by McCoy for a knockout. Nearly 55 years later, there
was a new invention – flashing red lights at the
boxing ring corners, to alert all boxers, including
deaf boxers that the round has ended. That invention,
unfortunately didn’t help McCoy’s deaf opponent.

 

— a new deaf entertainer

The 10th annual Black Choreographers Festival
is taking place right now in San Francisco.
One of the choreographers during the festival
is Antoine Hunter. He is deaf. Choreography
is dance body movements during a musical.
The newspaper said Antoine is a rising star,
giving strong performances.

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/deafdigest1

Twitter:
@deafdigest

02/23/14 Blue edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-blue-newsletter/

02/23/14 Gold edition at:
http://deafdigest.com/category/newsletter/newsletter-gold-newsletter/