2016/12/07

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, December 7, 2016

 
— movie critic remembers a famous deaf scene 20 years ago

A film critic said yesterday that a movie scene he would
never forget was in “Jerry Maguire” 20 years
ago. The plot revolved around Tom Cruise and Renee
Zellweger, both losing their jobs, and going down
the elevator. A deaf couple was also in the elevator
and they were hugging each other. The deaf man
signed something to the deaf woman. Just as when
everyone exited from the elevator, Jerry asked:

Wonder what he said?

Most of us would completely forget this brief
scene, but it stayed in the movie critic’s
memory for a long time. A picture is at:

http://deafdigest.com/brief-deaf-movie-scene/

 

— hypocrisy with ADA interview on TV

TV commentator Anderson Cooper ran a TV segment,
talking about the ADA. According to an angry
deaf TV watcher, that program, talking about
ADA, was not captioned! Hypocrisy? Yes.

 

— Deaf system in McDonald’s

Wayne and Gail Kennerknecht, not deaf, own several
McDonald’s fast food restaurants. They hire the
deaf and the disabled. A deaf employee, working
in the kitchen, needed to be able to communicate
with fellow employees that work in the front
counter. The owners came up with special
sign language gestures to allow the deaf employee
to keep up with these customers’ orders. They
said the deaf employee is the best employee
in the chain! These McDonald’s are located
in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia (Canada).

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— DeafHouse with warrant
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

12/04/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

 

2016/12/06

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, December 6, 2016

 
— a shock with a parole officer

An appointment with a parole officer is always
scary for all released prisoners, but maybe
especially more for released deaf prisoners.
A deaf man, in Louisiana, was not provided
with an interpreter for his appointment with
a parole officer! It can be scary because a
tiny misunderstanding, not interpreted, with
a parole officer can land the deaf person in
the prison again. A picture is at:

http://deafdigest.com/deaf-scared-by-parole-officers/

 

— people angry with new Germany disability law

Germany finally passed their own disability law,
sort of like our own ADA – but many people
are angry about it. They are saying the law
is a joke – while it promises to help improve
the lives of the deaf and the disabled, it
does not deal with one important issue –
employment! The law says nothing on how to
help find jobs for the deaf and the disabled.

 

— lipreading in the dark

Could a deaf person lipread when the room is
dark? No way! Yet, in the book “The Subsidiary”
written by Matía Celedó, the deaf character
lipreads a hearing person in a conversation
that took place in a dark room. Possible or
impossible?

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— rural town interpreters
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

12/04/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2016/12/05

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, December 5, 2016

— deaf person running for the Presidency

Europe is different from USA in that it has the
European Parliament. It does not tell the European
nations what to do – but just advises and passes
resolutions on what these nations should do, and
not be doing! Coming up soon is the election
for the Presidency of the European Parliament.
One of the candidates is Helga Stevens. She is
deaf and uses sign langauge, and is a Flemish
(Belgium) Member of the European Parliament.
A picture is at:

http://deafdigest.com/deaf-member-of-european-parliament/

 

 

— China trying to make it safe for deaf

Is China a safe place for the deaf? For deaf tourists,
yes – but for deaf residents, hard to say! The
Chinese police shut down 75 deaf criminal gangs
that forced the poorly-educated deaf to steal things
for them.

 

 

— deaf pro golfer hitting a hole in one

All golfers, both deaf and hearing, dream of
hitting a hole in one. Over the weekend,
one deaf pro golfer did – Sung Lee, South
Korea, participated at the India Panasonic
Open (on the Asian Pro Golf tour). He did
not win the tournament. Sung Lee, who has
been struggling for years, has a reputation
for being one of the longest hitters on the
Asian Tour, but with only one tournament win
to his credit.

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— Job, dream for the deaf
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

12/04/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2016/12/02

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, December 2, 2016

 
— strangest Christmas Tree ever
(picture)

to take a look at the strangest Christmas
Tree, go to:

http://deafdigest.com/strangest-christmas-tree/

 

— deaf participant in a big statewide event

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is the biggest
sporting event in Alaska. It gets a lot of
attention all over the world. And for years
all participants were hearing mushers. Eight
years ago the first deaf musher entered the
race – Andrew Huntington. He plans to continue
racing as long as he is able to do so. The
race distance is about 1,000 miles and it
takes between 9 to 15 days, depending on
weather, for the race to be completed.

 

— deaf driver problems with Lyft

Is Lyft a deaf-friendly company to work
for? They are in competition with Uber.
A deaf driver said he cannot communicate
with the Lyft management on proper
classification of his vehicle. He says
it can seat seven people, but Lyft says
his vehicle seats five people. Also
when a passenger hit him on the head,
he was not able to file a complaint with
Lyft. And the computer he uses to get
rides sometimes informs him via voice
instead of text.

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— handcuffed deaf man
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

11/27/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2016/12/01

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, December 1, 2016

— a big 400 percent increase as helped by the deaf

Many employers do not want to hire the deaf, thinking
their deafness prevents them from doing their jobs.
Well, what would the employers say if they realize
the deaf outperform the hearing by 400 percent?
The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority,
responsible for traffic control in Manila,
hired 11 deaf people. Their job is to watch the
videos and catch hearing drivers breaking
traffic laws. Results? Before the deaf were
hired, average number of violations caught
on video per day was just 70. After hiring
the deaf, the number of violations jumped
to 280 – a jump of 400 percent! See the
picture at:

http://deafdigest.com/deaf-watching-heavy-manila-traffic/

 

— Job quitters, deaf vs hearing

We have hearing people that quit their jobs. We
also have deaf people that quit their jobs.
Who quits the job more – hearing or deaf?
The Marriott International, which operates
hotels all over the world, said that only
six percent of the deaf, and the disabled,
quit their jobs whereas 52 percent of
hearing employees quit their jobs.
Deaf employees more loyal to their jobs
than hearing? Yes, in most cases!

 

— Hotel Hassler, past and now

Hotel Hassler, in Rome, Italy, is one of the world’s
best hotels (5-star). It is owned by a deaf man,
Roberto Wirth, who attended American School for
the Deaf (West Hartford, CT), Gallaudet and NTID.
His hotel, in the past, had 93 rooms. Now? Hotel
Hassler has grown bigger, adding more rooms.
And also – Roberto has also added another
hotel – Il Palazzetto, which is a few steps
away from his primary hotel – Hotel Hassler.
Not bad for Roberto, who was told by his
father all his life – that the deaf “can’t”
run a hotel!

 

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— strangest deaf hire
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

11/27/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2016/11/30

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, November 30, 2016

— a choice for deaf prisoners

Should deaf prisoners wear armbands, saying that they
are deaf, so that prison guards would know who they are?
This possibility has become an option for deaf prisoners
in Arlington, Virginia. Probably the deaf prisoners
would reject this option because it is a stigma.
A picture is at:

http://deafdigest.com/prisoners-that-are-deaf/

 

— painful use of sign language

Could a deaf person suffer pain in hands because
of signing a lot in one day? This is what a
deaf person, a new sign language user, said in an
interview with a newspaper reporter. This is
interesting. It is separate and apart from
interpreters suffering from Carpal Tunnel syndrome.

 

— a Coda helping new police officers

there was a newspaper story of Ted Baran, a Coda
who is the chief of Gallaudet police department,
teaching police recruits in Fairfax County,
Virginia on how to communicate with the deaf.
Baran told the recruits:

When they come across a police officer, their first
thing is fear because they can’t communicate with you

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— deaf postmaster
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

11/27/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2016/11/29

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, November 29, 2016

 
— high percentage of deaf in a supermarket chain

In Ukraine, people shop for food and goods at
Auchan, an European supermarket chain, which
serves 15 European nations. In Ukraine only,
the Auchan chain employs 3,800 people. 200
of these employees are deaf – in other words
five percent of Auchan Ukraine employees are
deaf. Could we go into Safeway, just an example,
and find that many deaf employees in one location?
No, but in Ukraine, yes! They do everything
that hearing employees do – cashiers, auditors,
inspectors, stockers, etc. A picture is at:

http://deafdigest.com/auchan-ukraine-hires-the-deaf/

 

— ideal job for the deaf

Sai Prasad, not deaf, is employed by Deloitte,
which is the world’s leading management
consulting firm. Fortune 500 companies
listen to advice from Deloitte consultants.
Anyway, Sai worked on a special project
on ways the deaf and the disabled can be
employed. He said that traffic officer
is an ideal job for the deaf. They are
not bothered by noise by street traffic!
Deaf traffic officers in New York, London,
Tokyo, Seoul and other crowded cities?
Why not!

 

— a surprise with a Gallaudet graduate

Howard Watson, who passed away and was given
a Dedication honor in DeafDigest was
revealed as a Gallaudet surprise. An oralist
he quickly picked up ASL at Gallaudet and
became quite fluent with it for the rest
of his life. Today’s story in a newspaper
said he was a skilled lipreader. It said
he was a champion lipreader, given
an assignment by Miami Herald, a newspaper,
to read the lips of President John F. Kennedy
at an Orange Bowl football game. Watson
used binoculars to read Kennedy’s lips.
At Gallaudet, Watson never talked about it,
nor did he brag about his lipreading skills!

 

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— Alien territory, deaf
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

11/27/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

 

 

2016/11/25

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, November 25, 2016

 

— a hard-working deaf farmer

Few days ago an obituary was published in a
Saskatechewan newspaper, honoring Willie
Hanelt, a deaf farmer in Benson, a tiny
town of 400 people. He worked on the family
farm and did everything that had to be done –
hauling grain, feeding the cattle, doing the
farm recordkeeping, identifying the better bulls
at auctions, maintaining the garden surrounding
the family home, etc. Whatever had to be done,
he would do it. When he was young, he had a
choice – between attending a school for the
deaf or staying home as a family farmer. He
chose farming, and never regretting it.
He is a Deaf Success story in Canada,
though not too many deaf people outside
of Saskatechewan knew about. A picture
is at:

http://deafdigest.com/hard-working-deaf-farmer/

 

— deaf woman teaching hearing women to protect themselves

Zaineb Abdulla, who is deaf and a resident of Chicago,
looks weak – just over five feet tall and weighing
just over 100 pounds. Yet she teaches hearing Muslim
women how to protect themselves when they’re out in
the public. She teaches them defensive moves in case
they’re physically threatened. She is an officer
with the Deaf Planet Soul, a social service agency
that empowers the deaf to fight for their rights.
Yet it is hearing women that come to her!

 

— a cruel Kansas power utility company

Is Kansas City Power and Light Company
cruel? This company turned off power at the
house where a seriously ill deaf child lived.
She depends on electricity to keep her
support systems running. Her condition
was so bad that a local hospital told the
power company not to shut off electricity.
The power company ignored the request
and still shut off the power. It made
the local news. Fortunately for the
deaf child, an anonymous person came
forward and paid the outstanding
electrical bill. The family was too
impoverished to be able to keep up with
the payments.

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— dog fools deaf master
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

11/20/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2016/11/24

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, November 24, 2016

 

— many deaf monks

Monks follow a way of life, much different from
everyone else. Many monks take a vow of silence,
never using their voice at all for the rest of
their lives. It is interesting to see a big
story in today’s media that many monks were
deaf – from way back to Year 700! A group
of archaeologists dug up buried skulls,
and learned that many of these monks
were deaf! Years ago deaf people were not
taught how to talk – any connection
with deaf monks never using their voice?

A picture is at:
http://deafdigest.com/ancient-monks/

 

— interpreter license, important or not important

There was a hot discussion among interpreters, both
deaf and hearing, in a midwestern state, that
interpreting certification is not important,
and that it should not be part of state licensing
laws! What does DeafDigest editor feel about it?
Yes, interpreters must get certificates, but
is concerned that fees needed to get such
certificates are too expensive.

 

— lipreading war: professional lipreader vs computer

Who will win the lipreading war? The professional
lipreader or the computer? Google owns a company
named DeepMind. This company worked with
engineers from University of Oxford to develop
a lipreading computer. Who won? It was said
that the computer was successful 47 percent of
the time whereas a professional lipreader
was successful 13 percent of the time. Are
we going to always carry our computer everytime
we meet a hearing person who wants to talk to us?

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— tale of two Booths
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

11/20/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2016/11/23

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, November 23, 2016

 

— finally a real deaf stamp

We have many, many stamps that honor deaf individuals
– but they were honored for helping the hearing, not
helping the deaf. We have deaf individuals, noted for
helping the deaf, that deserve stamps of their own,
but the Postal Service paid it no attention. Finally,
this Postal Service has come up with a new deaf stamp,
honoring Robert Panara, the long time professor at
Gallaudet and at NTID. He is being noted for his
contributions to Deaf Culture. Hopefully it paves the
way for outstanding deaf individuals (Mac Norwood,
who pushed hard for TV and movies captions; Boyce
Williams, who pushed hard for a long list of deaf
social and educational services and Frederick C.
Schreiber, who pushed hard for first class Deaf
Citizenship rights).

A picture of Panara is at:
http://deafdigest.com/deaf-stamp-for-helping-the-deaf/

 

— deaf landmark for sale

The Volta Place, in Washington, DC, is for sale.
Cost as listed by the realtor is nearly $2.4 million.
It was the home of the Alexander Graham Bell
Association for the Deaf (AgBell). It was
a landmark for people that strongly believed in
Oral Education of the Deaf. DeafDigest editor,
who uses ASL, was invited to attend a social
event at the AgBell building few years ago.
The social event was packed with people that
used either – oral and ASL! Everyone was
welcome regardless of their choice of language.

 

— perfect person not deaf

India has an interesting attitude. If a deaf person
has no hearing aid, has no CI and speaks perfectly
he is not deaf – in the eyes of many hearing
people of India! This attitude prevents these
deaf people from getting services they need
because of their deafness. The Right with
Disabilities Bill, now in legislative session,
is trying to change it all that.

 

 

Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

Barry’s collections of past articles (with today’s update)
— Deaf Culture disagreement
http://deafdigest.com/collections/barrys-collections/

11/20/16 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/