2019/05/10

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 10, 2019

 

— deaf actor in a mysterious Netflix film plot

Sean Berdy, the deaf actor of the “Switched at Birth”
fame, has been cast as Sam in the Netflix movie
“The Society.” The plot of this film is
mysterious – almost same as “The Twilight
Zone” of the fifties and sixties.

 

— deaf paramedic’s fascinating career

Richard Webb-Stevens is deaf and is a full-time
paramedic with these fascinating backgrounds.
He first served with the Ambulance Service
before moving on to the Air Ambulance.
He is currently with the Motorcycle Response
Unit. We have frustrated deaf people in
USA wanting to become paramedics but have
been discriminated because of their deafness.
Well, Richard Webb-Stevens is from
London (Great Britain) and gets these jobs!

 

— Seattle bar owner is anti-captions

DeafDigest mentioned that Seattle became the
3rd American city to require captions to be
turned on at all times. Matt Miera owns
Marco Polo Bar and Grill in Seattle; he is
afraid the “forced” captions would drive
his patrons out of his bar. Well, his bar
advertises “best fried chicken in Seattle.”
People who drink beer would love these best
fried chickens, and for that reason, stay
at the bar!

 

 

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2019/05/09

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 8, 2019

 

— what to do if no money in budget for interpreters

We have ADA but many groups, associations and
organizations just have no money in their budgets
for interpreters. What to do? Two choices –
bring your own interpreter. Yes, it costs money.
Second choice is to use Video Remote Interpreting.
Unfortunately it also costs money and FCC does not
cover it, only covers video relay services, two
separate and different things. A deaf person
said two choices work for him.

 

— three in; 19,351 to go

So far Ann Arbor (Michigan), Portland (Oregon)
and Seattle have laws that require TV in public
places to be captioned at all times. That means
19,351 cities and towns to go. The U.S. Census
bureau said we have 19,354 “incorporated places”
in USA. Long way to go? Hope not. Goal is these
big cities – New York, Chicago, Los Angeles,
as well as Austin, Rochester and Washington, DC
(these three great cities with large deaf
populations).

 

— a blessing for a late-deafened person

A late-deafened person said deafness is a
blessing. That person said:

I found out there’s a whole new language and
a culture that I didn’t even know about. There
are so many people that I wouldn’t have met,
so many things I wouldn’t have experienced
had I not learned about deafness.

That person is correct.

 

 

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05/05/19 Blue and Gold editions & sub options at:
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2019/05/08

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 8, 2019

— new ideas for deaf sending emergency 911 texts

A group of deaf people told the director of
the Charleston County Consolidated Dispatch
(South Carolina) that they would be comfortable
sending a picture of an accident and the location
of the accident instead of having to key in these
words. The director said it was a great
idea and is hoping the photo-sending could be
part of the next 911-text generation.

 

— not setting up funds for interpreters in budgets

Many deaf people are members of the Home Owners’
Associations (HOA). Board of directors of HOA’s
are responsble for setting up budgets to
fund operations and activities. How many of
these HOA’s (with deaf owners) would set up
funds in the budgets for interpreters?
Probably very few, or possibly none! And
when deaf people demand interpreters, there
is no money in the budget. This has led to
some cases of bitternesses between the
deaf and the HOA boards.

 

— free lance deaf fashion designer

Fashion design is a competitive, cut-throat business.
Not easy to find a full time job in this field, but
for Farah Nadhirah Kordy, a deaf Pakistan woman,
she found a different way towards success. She
became a free lancer, traveling to different
nations – Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Turkey,
Singapore, Indonesia, Belgium, Thailand and India
and was able to get these free lance designing
jobs. While these jobs were not full time, she
was able to earn income from these assignments.

 

 

Deaf jobs – latest update
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05/05/19 Blue and Gold editions & sub options at:
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2019/05/07

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 7, 2019

— the deaf chef and the hostile restaurant kitchen environment

Two hearing chefs sat down for an interview. They said that
hostile kitchen environment is common in restaurants, saying
every chef is for themselves (promotions, better opportunities,
etc). We have a number of deaf chefs; hostile kitchen
environment holding them back? It may be possible.

 

— a disturbing survey

A survey was taken of hearing people in one location.
It said that just over 50 percent of them do not
feel comfortable communicating with the deaf.
And that about 20 percent of them get nervous
when they need to communicate with the deaf.
Deafphobia, sadly, is what they have.

 

— a challenge for deaf campaigners for public office

From time to time there are deaf candidates for election
to public offices. Most don’t win but some do. Their
biggest challenge is to stay away from Deaf Issues because
these turn off hearing voters. Instead they must focus
on issues these voters are concerned about – jobs, health
and social services, traffic issues, lower taxes – and
even street potholes!

 

 

Deaf jobs – latest update
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

05/05/19 Blue and Gold editions & sub options at:
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2019/05/06

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 6, 2019

— a reason to go to Gallaudet or NTID

One reason why a graduate, according to a
newspaper story, did not go to a hearing
college. That graduate said she did not
want to spend four years communicating
with a third party through an interpreter!
That person is correct.

 

— some states unfair to interpreters

If interpreters want to be licensed in Illinois,
they must pay a $900 fee, take more than
four years of college and pass two exams.
What about other states? It was said that
nearly 30 states do not require licensing
of interpreters. Unfair? Well, 50 states
means 50 different sets of state interpreting laws!

 

— Makaton vs ASL

Makaton was invented by the Royal Association for Deaf
(UK) in 1970’s but has been used to help
hearing people that have no speaking skills. It is
more of a Gesture Sign Language, a gesture is used
to express a word. It is used in several countries.
Perhaps if hearing people and non-signing deaf in
USA learned Makaton they could communicate much
easily with the signing deaf!

 

 

Deaf jobs – latest update
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

05/05/19 Blue and Gold editions & sub options at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/