Deafdigest » Mid-Week

2015/12/23

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition, December 23, 2015

— eye hospital depends on a deaf man

The Aravind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India depends on
a deaf man to keep it operating successfully every day.
S. Poornachandran (first name not known) is deaf and
was a welder. He changed careers, repairing and
maintaining hundreds of medical instruments and machines.
Over the years he has trained ophthalmologists and
hospital administrators on how to keep these
medical instruments in top operating condition.
He has even trained professionals from many
different nations. A hospital administrator said
it was not necessary to hire engineers from
other nations to come and fix these machines.
Does this deaf man have perfect speech? No,
he cannot speak at all; he uses gestures and
demonstrations to teach people the right way
to fix these machines. His picture is at:

http://deafdigest.com/hospital-depends-on-deaf-man/

 
— anti-lipreading movie

Many hearing people think deaf people can lipread.
“Can You Read My Lips?” is a new short movie, produced by
a deaf woman, Rachel Kolb. She explains, in the filming,
why perfect lipreading is impossible. She agrees that
30 percent of the words can be lip-readable, but says
the remaining 70 percent can make the conversation
impossible.

 

 

— TTY is out; RTT is in

The TTY network started in the sixties; it forever
changed the Deaf World. But for the past 20 years
it has become obsolete as more deaf people use
emails, videos and social media to communicate
with each other. DeafDigest editor does not even
have a TTY at home. RTT, according to one high
tech article, may be what we need to communicate
with each other. RTT means real-time text,
and even AT&T, which created the TTY network,
is in favor of it. What is RTT? When a person
types something, the person on the other end
of the line can see it as it is being typed
one letter at a time. With the TTY, one had
to wait until the person has finished typing.
A team of researchers from Gallaudet, the
University of Wisconsin-Madison and Sweden’s
Omnitor have been working on this project.
A big problem? FCC hates it!

 

 

 
Latest deaf jobs:
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/ or click on “jobs”
past Mid-Week & morning editions:
http://deafdigest.com/category/mid-week-news/
12/20/15 Blue and Gold editions at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

 

 

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