Deafdigest » Newsletter Blue, Newsletters

Deaf Digest Blue – October 23, 2011

This angry applicant has filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

WHAT DO INTERPRETERS HATE?

A hearing person telling the interpreter – “I know how to sign”

and he struggles with the letters H and I while trying to fingerspell “Hi”

if you have these “hate” or “horror” stories, please mailto:barry@deafdigest.com

COMMENTS FROM A CART OPERATOR – continuing series

When I have worked at different events as a court reporter, CART provider, or captioner, oftentimes people have approached me who have never seen a steno machine up close.

They usually ask how the machine works, and one of the first comments many people make when they see the machine for the first time is that there are no letters on the keys.  The tops of the keys are blank. They wonder how we know which keys are which.

People who use the steno machine must memorize what all the keys are.  There are 22 keys on the machine.  We use combinations of letters to make other letters.  We don’t depress one key at a time like you would on a typewriter or computer keyboard, but we stroke multiple keys at once, much like chords on a piano.  A captioner must memorize what combinations of keys must be depressed in order to make up the phonetic sounds that occur in the English language.

Writing whole words and phrases in a single stroke is a very important factor in being able to reach the high speeds necessary to be court reporters, CART providers, and captioners.

ATTITUDE ISSUES When an employer asks:

How can I trust a deaf employee to operate a machinery that costs one million dollars?

Does that hearing employee need an attitude adjustment? Very certainly, yes!

…………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………..

weekly DeafDigest Blue & Gold editions also posted at:

http://deafdigest.com/

updated every Monday

…………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………..

TO BE DEAF AND TO BE ISOLATED

There are newspaper stories saying that technology will render obsolete our sign language  – and that the future deaf will prefer to mingle with hearing than with their peers – and that deafness will be completely eradicated thanks to the CI and genetical engineering.

True or false?

DeafDigest wishes to point out this following example:

At a beach in New York, a deaf group sitting around on the sand was surprised when a young deaf woman, a stranger, approached them, trying to say hi. She could only communicate via gestures and body language and some “make-do” lipreading. She was thrilled to see a group of deaf people and wanted to join in the fun with them. Unfortunately she was originally with a group of young hearing people, and they yelled and waved at her, telling her to come back and to “leave the deaf people alone”

She was never seen again after that encounter.

next week – another example

…………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………..

For postings, announcements and employment ad rates, please email mailto:barry@deafdigest.com

for Special Notes, please go to the bottom of the Gold section

…………………………………………………….. ……………………………………………………..

Hot DeafNews boring, but important!

the FCC told approximately 300 TV program providers that they must caption their TV programs even though all of them pleaded poverty.

…….

The Deaf and the Law:

A mentally-challenged deaf Chinese man was accused of arson at a restaurant that caused extensive damage. Arrested, he did not understand the proceedings in the courtroom and pled guilty.

Afterwards, the judge realized the deaf man did not understand what was going on, and ordered a different interpreter for him. The judge then asked the deaf man, via the interpreter several times to ask him to make a plea. Fully realizing it, the deaf man pled not guilty each time the judge asked him. He will be assigned a trial date.

……

News of the Week – Looking Back 10 Years Ago:

DEAFDIGEST dedicates this edition to Silent News founder Julius Wiggins who passed away on October 13th. In 1969, Julius felt there is a need for a deaf national monthly newspaper that would serve the deaf community. Not only he launched it with the assistance of wife Harriet but he had it sustained throughout the years. Deaf publications have came and gone but Silent News (monthly) and The Frat (bi-monthly magazine-type format) continue as the longest serving deaf community publications. DEAFDIGEST editor, who cut his teeth in the publications world with the Silent News, salutes Julius for a job well done!

Comments are closed.