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Deaf Digest Gold – October 16, 2011

In a newspaper story, Malaysian businesses were scolded by a deaf activist because of bad customer service. The customer service people do not like to deal with the deaf, and have, on many occasions, been disrespectful with them.

– Very Hot News

How important is twitter, as far as national disaster emergencies impacting on Deaf Households are concerned? Very much so, according to Steph Jo Kent, a deaf woman,

While deaf advocates scream about emergency captions on TV, about emergency TTY calls, availability of interpreters, etc, the twitter trumps them all! She said the twitter kept her up to date on emergency developments in her home community.

– Thursday October 13th

Do not trivialize Gallaudet University. This is what Gallaudet students are saying. This is in reference to the efforts of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to change the name of the metro stop from New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U to New York Ave-NoMa with Gallaudet as a subtitle. The students are requesting that the station be named NoMa-Gallaudet U.

– Friday October 14th

Test. Just Testing. Do not panic.

This is the message FCC will be telling TV viewers on November 9, 2011 at 2 PM EST.  It is a test emergency message just to see if the system works.

DeafDigest hopes people would not panic, knowing it is just a test.

– Saturday October 15th

Lindsay Hoyle, not deaf, is a British MP that pushed for the use of wireless devices in the Parliament. That way, he said, deaf constituents can quickly keep up with the discussions as opposed to waiting for traditional reports (newspapers, internet, CART, etc).

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Deaf Miscellaneous stuff:

The Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene, a hospital in Keene, New Hampshire, reached settlement with the U.S. District Court. This hospital had no interpreter on duty when an expectant deaf mother came in. This hospital also agreed to train its staff on how to deal with deaf patients.

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weekly DeafDigest Blue & Gold editions also posted at:

http://deafdigest.com

updated every Monday

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ALL ULTRATEC TTYs ON SALE!

No “Tricks” just “Treats” at WCI in October! All Ultratec TTYs are 25% off! Choose from several different models all with superior quality and state-of-the art technology. You’re sure to find a TTY that is right for you. Call us at 1-800-233-9130 (V/TTY) or visit us at or online at: http://www.weitbrecht.com/onsale.php?utm_source=dd  for more details on our TTYs and all our other products.

We’re on Facebook and Twitter!

WCI. Your Single Source for Assistive Technology

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LOSING PATIENCE WITH PENMANSHIP Penmanship means perfect handwriting. And for some hearing people using penmanship, these deaf people lose patience. There are some hearing people that take as much as five minutes to write a short sentence because of slow and careful penmanship. It is not easy for a restless deaf person to stand and wait for five minutes while the hearing person struggles with writing a note.

– for ASL News version with captions, please visit http://deafdigest.com/videos/deaf-hate-slow-penmanship/

(for your convenience, video links are posted on top of each DeafDigest edition)

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Workplace survey on behalf of deaf and hard of hearing individuals

Survey by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Workplace Accommodations is at:

http://deafdigest.com/deaf-workplace-research-survey/

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BE CAREFUL OF A SHOULDER TAP Deaf people are always tapping other deaf people on their shoulders to call attention. The law says that if someone touches another person, it is assault and battery. It is not a problem when a deaf person is touched because knows that he cannot hear and is being asked to pay attention. But if a deaf person accidentally taps a hearing person on the shoulder, it may be a different story. A deaf person in the postal service was twice fired for touching a hearing person on the shoulder. The hearing person complained and the deaf person was fired. The union got the job back for the deaf person, but again he was fired for the same reason. So, touching a deaf person is different from touching a hearing person.

– for ASL News version with captions, please visit: http://deafdigest.com/videos/deaf-shoulder-tap/

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