thriving-deaf-blacksmith

For many years until he passed away recently,
James Hanenmaayer, a deaf man, earned a full
time living as a blacksmith in a rural Illinois
town. He learned this craft from his father but
took classes plus taking advice from fellow
blacksmiths.

 

He uses pen and pad to communicate with
horse owners that specify exactly how they
wanted their horses to be properly fitted
with horseshoes.

 

He made mistakes at the start of his career,
but in due time, he improved – and built up
a list of satisfied clients that have become
his regular customers.

 

He made this comment – an average blacksmithing
job takes one or two hours per horse and I can’t
work too fast.