2019/05/24

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 24, 2019

— typical day of ASL interpreter

What is the typical day of ASL interpeter?
There is no such a thing as a typical
day is what the interpreter said! Some days
it starts early and continues until late
at night – moving around different locations.
Some days the interpreter stays with just
one deaf person. Some days, no interpreting
assignments – so just stays home to catch up
with invoicing paperwork.

 

— biggest complaint about TV captions

Students at a deaf school had one complaint
about TV captions. They said captions stay on
the screen for only a few seconds during news
programs. These quickly changing captions
prevent these students from reading the
lines in full.

 

— new Ohio pilot program helps the deaf

At Ohio School for the Deaf, a pilot program
is going on – with the asisstance of
Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities
and the Ohio Department of Higher Education.
Deaf adults go online to get instruction
in basic courses. Responses from deaf adult
students have been positive.

 

 

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2019/05/23

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 23, 2019

— Volkswagen trying to be deaf-friendly

A deaf advisory group was asked by Volkswagen
in a recent meeting in Washington, DC on how
to make their cars deaf-friendly. Hope
the Volkswagen people have listened to the
deaf instead of tuning out the advice.

 

 

— comment by a hearing actor

A hearing actor made this coment in a
newspaper interview. He said:

I enjoy playing deaf in the play. It is
a fun character for me.

We always hate it when hearing actors
play deaf roles, and this comment
only makes us hate it more.

 

 

— deaf sports funding; Canada yes, USA no

The Amateur Sports Act of 1978 was supposed
to help the USA Deaflympics group with funding.
For a short time, there was funding but no
more. Well, the Canadian government will be
contributing almost $800,000 to help fund
Deaf Canadians’ participation in Deaflympics.
Zero funding from USA. A big shame!

 

 

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2019/05/22

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 22, 2019

— things with deaf students at hearing colleges

A deaf student at a hearing college said these
things are – having two interpreters, having two
captioners, using video relay services all the time,
teaching ASL with hearing classmates yet these
hearing classmates being too busy with their own
studies to help out communicate in ASL, no-shows
or absences among interpreters and captioners,
professors’ negative attitudes, arguments and
disagreements with administrators on exactly
what ADA is supposed to do, and so on.

 

— typewriter invented to help the deaf

True or false that Alexander Graham Bell invented
the telephone in hopes of helping the deaf to hear?
Well, there is another tale – that a typewriter
was invented in 1867 by Rasmus Malling-Hansen
in hopes of helping the deaf to speak better by
using their fingers on the keyboard! True or false?
Now – put together the telephone and the typewriter
and there was a 1964 TTY invention by Robert
Weitbrecht! This one is VERY true.

 

— vague ADA rules and guidelines

An attorney, specializing in Disability Law, has accused
the Federal government and the Department of Justice of
not giving out clear guidelines on ADA regulations. He
also said that this is the reason for the glut of ADA
lawsuits choking the American court system!

 

 

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2019/05/21

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 21, 2019

— Russia’s top deaf thief continues with detention

Valery Rukhledev, the past president of the Deaflympics
governing body as well as the past president of the
All-Russian Society of the Deaf, was sentenced to
house arrest last year for stealing nearly one
million dollars. Because he has not followed
the conditions of his house arrest, the Moscow
City Court has ordered that his detention be
continued.

 

— the robot cop and the deaf driver

A new robot is being built to function as a
robo-cop. When there is a traffic stop, the
robo-cop will approach the driver and go
from there. Operating the robo-cop is the
real cop, sitting in the police car.
Hopefully this would stop the senseless
shootings that take place during traffic
stops. A big concern is the deaf driver.
What would the robo-cop do with the
stopped deaf driver? We shall wait and
see.

 

 

— a deaf man was in combat during World War I

From time to time there are efforts in USA to
have the Department of Defense to allow the
deaf to serve in the military forces. Howard
Lloyd, a young deaf man, fought in World
War I and was involved in combat – sneaking
behind the enemy lines. He signed up for the
military in Canada and was turned down.
He somehow was able to enroll – details
are murky but it seems that the Canadian
military left did not know what the
military right was doing – and so, fell
through the cracks! His combat work
took place in France. He was wounded
once but suffered no ill effects and lived
a long life in Canada.

 

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2019/05/20

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – May 20, 2019

— a dead profession that employed many deaf people

There was a story of a dead profession that employed
many deaf people – the newspaper press. Years ago
everyone read the newspapers (no texts, no emails,
no social media, no nothing). Anyway it said some
of these hearing pressmen knew some sign language
in order to communicate with the deaf pressmen.
No more!

 

— a Dummy Hoy tale

Dummy Hoy had a long major league career including
several seasons with the old Washington (DC) team.
In the 1888 and 1889 seasons with the Washington
team, one of his teammates was Hank O’Day. Hank
was a Coda, and knew sign language. Baseball
historians have assumed that Dummy and Hank were
“best friends” with the team in these two seasons!

 

— great attitude vs anti-discrimination laws

Many hearing people are afraid of the deaf.
As a result, deaf people face discrimination
every day. Mark Medoff wrote the play
“Children of a Lesser God,” even though he
knew nothing about the deaf and of deafness
at that time! The first deaf person he met
was deaf actress Phyllis Frelich. Within
20 minutes of the introduction, he
decided to write a play about the deaf.
If we had many million Mark Medoffs,
there would be no discrimination and
the ADA laws would have been unnecessary!
Unfortunately this is not realistic and
as a result we have these ADA laws.

 

 

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