2019/02/18

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – February 18, 2019

 

— public service announcement to help police officers

The Center for Public Television is setting up a new
public service announcement – for police officers
to teach them how to deal with the deaf. Hope this
helps.

 

— a powerful person in Congress and the deaf

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is the most powerful
person in Congress. She has a deaf person on
her staff – Michael Tecklenburg. He advises
her on legal and policy issues. This leads to
a question – has Pelosi, because of her deaf
staffer, has done anything to help the deaf
in any way?

 

— Internet Movie Database ranks #1 movie

“A Quiet Place” has been ranked by the
Internet Movie Database as the #1 horror
movie. The leading character is
Millicent Simmonds, a deaf actress who
plays the role of a deaf child.

 

 

Deaf jobs – latest update
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

02/17/19 Blue and Gold editions & sub options at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

fogey – interpreter referral agency

fogey010106

One of Davideo’s projects is the comic strip, THE OLD FOGEYS. This strip focuses on tongue-in-cheek comedy, representing a revival of the old classic humor of days gone past combined with today’s Deaf Issues and Deaf Concerns. Email: DAVIDEO@satx.rr.com Web: http://www.davideo.tv Read more http://deafdigest.net/category/comics/ Read more http://deafdigest.net/category/comics/

 

2019/02/15

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – February 15, 2019

 

— more on the lawsuit against cities

Yesterday’s DeafDigest news said that more cities
are shuting down their streaming videos because
of high costs of captions. It was learned today
that over 50 cities on Florida have been slapped
with closed captioning lawsuits – all filed by
one deaf person! DeafDigest is worried that
excessive enforcement of ADA regulations may
come back to haunt us.

 

— ASL signs dialect hard to understand

There was a newspaper story about accents and dialects
in Philadelphia, which also said sign language can be
difficult to follow. This is correct; several times
in the past DeafDigest editor tried to follow the
sign language conversation by some deaf people in
Philadelphia. Almost impossible to follow. Just
like two deaf people conversing in French Sign
Language that DeafDigest editor observed and
could not understand!

 

— the hated phrase is “pilot program”

A pilot program is the same thing as a trial
basis – and it is always hated as far as
open captioned movies are concerned. The
Criterion Theatre in Bar Harbor, Maine
is offering open captioned movies as a
pilot program. What this means is when
attendance is low, the program will be
shut down – with this “I told you, open
captions is bad for business” attitude!
Maine is a fairly big state with too
many remote towns. It requires long
distance driving; movie scheduls conflict
with deaf people’s job hours; conflict
with other family plans, etc.

 

Deaf jobs – latest update
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

02/10/19 Blue and Gold editions & sub options at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/

2019/02/14

DeafDigest Mid-Week edition – February 14, 2019

— it has happened to U. of California, now happening to small towns

ADA lawsuit over captions on video streams forced University of
California at Berkeley to take down all of their video streams.
It is now happening to smaller American towns for the same
reason – high costs of captions. ADA laws coming back to
haunt us?

 

— a puzzling newspaper obit

Donald L. “Pat” Irwin, Council Bluffs, Iowa,
departed us. The newspaper obit said:

Pat was born September 16, 1932, in Iowa City, Iowa.
He graduated from Iowa School for the Deaf in 1951,
where he excelled in basketball. Pat proudly served his
country in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean War.

Serving in the Korean War? Was he very hard of hearing
as if being almost-very hearing? DeafDigest editor knows
of a graduate of 47 School for the Deaf (NYC) who said
he fought in the Korean War, but became evasive when
asked further questions.

 

— most human resources people do not know this rule

When human resources people interview deaf applicants,
accompanied by their interpreters, they do not know
this rule – speak directly to the deaf person and not
towards the interpreter. This rule has been broken
too many times, even if the deaf person ends up
getting the job he was looking for!

 

 

Deaf jobs – latest update
http://deafdigest.com/category/jobs/

02/10/19 Blue and Gold editions & sub options at:
http://deafdigest.com/newsletters/